Aboriginal Peoples and Natural Resources in Canada

Claudia Notzke     

Captus University Publications, ISBN 978-1-895712-03-2 (1994)
352 pages, 650 g, 7 X 10, $35.00 (US$28.00)
 

The only up-to-date book of its kind, Aboriginal Peoples and Natural Resources in Canada explores the restraints and opportunities which aboriginal people encounter in their efforts to use renewable and non-renewable resources, and to gain management power over these resources. This book applies an historical perspective and takes into account cultural, political, legal and geographical variables. Among the topics are hunting and trapping rights, forestry issues, resource management regimes under the comprehensive claims process and co-management schemes. The issue of aboriginal peoples and protected areas is discussed. Drawing on international examples, aboriginal experiences with environmental impact assessment are also examined. This book is an essential resource for people engaged in the use and management of natural resources, as well as those who seek professional training in the field and anyone wanting to know more about the social and environmental issues pertaining to more responsible and equitable environmental management.

Table of Contents   top

COMMENTARY ON THE COVER

PREFACE

CHAPTER ONE: Native Perspectives on Natural Resource Management
Introduction
Resource Management: The Concept
Significance of Natural Resources in the Aboriginal Context
Significance of Aboriginal Resource Management
Traditional Environmental Knowledge
Conclusion
 

CHAPTER TWO: Water Resources
Introduction
Scope and Origin of Native Water Rights
Regulation and Abrogation of Native Water Rights
Megaproject Psychology and Its Impact on Native Water Rights
Indian Use of Water Resources: Wild Rice Harvesting
Native Water Rights in Contemporary Agreements
Conclusion and Outlook
 

CHAPTER THREE: Fisheries
Introduction
The West Coast
Eastern Seaboard and Quebec
Ontario
The Prairie Provinces
The North
Conclusion and Outlook
 

CHAPTER FOUR: Forestry
Introduction
Forestry in Canada: An Overview
Indian Reserve Forest Lands: Problems and Issues
Regulatory Regimes and Native Access to Off-Reserve Forest Lands
Forestry Pressures on Aboriginal Lands: Problems and Solutions
Conclusion and Outlook 
 

CHAPTER FIVE: Wildlife
Introduction
Hunting Rights
Fur-Bearer Harvesting
Commercialization of Wildlife
Game Ranching
Commercial Hunting
Aboriginal Wildlife Management
Conclusion and Outlook
 

CHAPTER SIX: Land
Introduction
The Aboriginal Land Base in the Provinces
Aboriginal Lands North of Sixty
Conclusion and Outlook
 

CHAPTER SEVEN: Non-Renewable Resources
Introduction
The Eastern Provinces: Frustrated Opportunities
The Prairie Provinces: Non-Renewable Resources -Blessing or Blight?
British Columbia: Resources, People and the Province — Irreconcilable Differences?
The North: Changing Ground Rules for Development
Conclusion and Outlook
 

CHAPTER EIGHT: Native People and Protected Areas
Introduction: Protected Areas, Endangered Spaces and Sacred Places
The Legislative and Conceptual Framework of Protected Areas
Aboriginal People and Parks: Lessons from Abroad
Native People and Parks in the Provinces: Conflict and Compromise
Parks North of Sixty: New Horizons
Aboriginal Parks: Innovative Concepts
Conclusion and Outlook
 

CHAPTER NINE: Native People and Environmental Impact Assessment
Introduction: EIA at a Crossroads
EIA and Aboriginal People: Problems and Issues
Selected Native Experiences and Government Procedures
Aboriginal Initiatives in Impact Assessment and Review
EIA and Comprehensive Claims Agreements
Conclusion and Outlook
 

CHAPTER TEN: Synthesis and Outlook
Introduction
Means for Gaining Control over Resources
Co-Management — The Way of the Future?
Outlook

APPENDIX

REFERENCES

INDEX

CREDITS

Instructor Resources   top

Related Resources   top

About the Author   top

Associate Professor Claudia Notzke studied geography, social anthropology and geology in Germany, South Africa and Canada. She has carried out fieldwork on Third World and Fourth World issues in Southern Africa, the United States and Canada. She taught geography at the Universities of Calgary and Lethbridge, and now is an Associate Professor in the International Program of the Faculty of Management, University of Lethbridge, where she teaches courses and conducts research in the fields of environmental management and sustainable tourism development.